WYALUSING HOTEL & ANNEX
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Thank you for visiting the Wyalusing Hotel website. Take a moment to peruse our pages to find exactly what you're looking for - a wonderful dining experience! We offer luxurious lodging couple with a traditional American cuisine. With tons of things to do in town, and plenty of nearby attractions, there is never a dull moment.
The Wyalusing Hotel enjoys a wide reputation for fine food and warm hospitality. A warm and friendly atmosphere awaits you at the historic Wyalusing Hotel, located along the shores of the Susquehanna River, amidst some of Pennsylvania's most beautiful mountain scenery. With all that the area has to offer, we provide a home away from home for Romantic Couples, Hunters, Fishermen, and Outdoor Enthusiasts alike. Only a few hours drive from the New York- New Jersey metropolitan area, the Wyalusing Hotel is the perfect spot for a weekend getaway. The Hotel has been the centre of the area's social activity for over 100 years. Founded in 1860 as the Brown Hotel, the building is one of the architectural masterpieces designed by J. Morgan Brown, Wyalusing's illustrious "Gingerbread Man". Brown, an architect/contractor, had a special talent for creating gingerbread profusion of ornately cut wood. He created intricate decorative facades for a number of buildings in the area. The Hotel's Mississippi riverboat porches are a perfect example of Brown's handiwork. A great deal of yesteryear still remains at the Hotel. The original two-story barn, used as a "first-call" livery stable, and the ice house still stand at the rear of the building. At one time the brick portion of the hotel, built in 1882, was capped with a massive wooden facade with ornate gingerbread cutouts. The newer section of the Hotel, where our dining room is located, was originally the Brown homestead and was constructed in 1894. Please spend a minute or two in our lobby area where you will find many pictures of the Hotel from years gone by. We also have on display guest registers and rate sheets from the late 1800s and early 1900s.